Four Season Glamping

Glamping seems to be a recent addition to vocabulary in the travel world.  The Urban Dictionary defines it as:  “Shorthand for glamorous camping; luxury camping.”  While the masculine half of the Fighting Couple loves getting into the woods, the Femme Fatale…not so much.  We are not exactly “yurt” type travelers.  We have found a happy medium in Glamping.  While there is likely a hierarchy of levels of “comfort”, ours simply includes the use of a cabin and not a tent.    Each year we try to take one or two cabin glamping trips, sometimes only as a couple, sometimes with family and friends.  One of the keys to successful “cabin glamping” is finding the right season to go.  Each offers unique benefits and drawbacks.  Here are some things to consider for each of the seasons:

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Summer

We bring summer up first as it is frankly the best.  There is nothing like leaving the busy hustle of everyday life and connecting with evergreens.  Trade cell phone chatter for the babble of a brook.  There are a myriad of summer alpine activities: hiking, biking, whitewater, golf, or just kicking back with a great book.   The summer alpine setting offers cools mornings and evening and long warm days.  Popular summer glamping locations include: Sun Valley, ID, Park City, UT and of course Galtlinburg, TN.

Winter

Winter is likely the season of glamping that most are familiar with.  Winter is also the most expensive, and thus our least favorite.  Bookings can fill fast in December, so plan to get your booking well in advance.  For those that ski, winter glamping is nirvana.  Winter activities include Nordic and alpine skiing, sledding, and hot tubbing.  Many alpine resorts offer a horse drawn sled dinner excursion.

Fall

Autumn is a great time to get out to the mountains.  With the fall colors on, the clean brisk mountain air, and of course the warm fire in the evening..  Fall is the perfect time to glamp as a couple.  Fall is often a “shoulder” season, and rates for cabins can be fairly reasonable.  In the states, try to avoid Labor day weekend, as you will likey have to pay a premium.  Fall is perfect of hikes, fishing, boating as well as golf.

Spring

Spring is a tricky season for cabin glamping.  You must realize that spring in lower elevations is still winter in the higher.  You also have the challenge of mud.  As the winter run off is in full swing, activities such as hiking and biking will be limited.  The upside of booking in the spring is that some of the best deals can be had.

couple walkingKey to a great “Glamp”

Just as with any other sort of travel, being prepared will enhance your stay.  Renting a cabin is much different than booking a standard hotel room.  Cabin prices depend on number of factors including: number of bedrooms, location, and amenities.  Many cabin rental sites do a fair job describing all the terms, but must ask the important questions.  1) Is there a minimum nights say?  Many cabin rentals are 2-3 nights min.  While others cabin rentals might require a weeks stay.  If the adverts doesn’t stay, ask.  2) Price-Understand who is responsible for what.  Key questions would be: is there a deposit (many require this), is there a cleaning fee, and is there a different price for a weekend stay (there usually is).  A few questions before booking will make for a better experience.  Trust us!

Cabin Glamping is truly a great couple activity.  Yes, we are markedly anti- tent.  While cabining is not a 5-star resort, it can be a very luxurious.  Make the proper preparations, and have a great couple Glamp!  Whether you chose sunny Park City, UT or beautiful Gatlinburg, TN or a location near you, get out and glamp!  A couple of sites to check out to book your cabin:   www.ParkCityRentals.info and www.GatlinburgCabinRentals.com.

Have you been glamping as a couple?  Where did you stay?  We want to hear from you if you have staysed in a yurt as a couple!  Leave a comment below and share your ideas and suggestions.

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