Tag Archives | traveling couple

A Visit to the Holy Land: Israel and Beyond

There are a lot of destinations that call themselves holy.  With that said, few places can claim that three of the world’s major faiths call the place sacred.  The land we speak of is Israel.  We recently returned from a two week visit and want to give you the ultimate guide to seeing the sacred sites.  This will be a two part post, with the first highlighting the religious sites of Israel, and the second will be about a side trip into Jordan.  Both are must dos, and compliment each other well.

Beautiful Jerusalem

Safety

Ok. First off, let’s take on the biggest reservation we hear about visiting the region.  “Is it safe?”  The answer is yes and no.  Will an AK-47 armed terrorist kidnap you and hold you for ransom?  No.  Will you run over a roadside bomb driving your rented Toyota down the freeway? No. Could you be pick pocketed in a busy street loaded with tourists? Yes.  Could a valuable in your parked car be taken? Yes. If you wander into the wrong area late at night, might you meet some baddies? Perhaps.

Our advice to staying safe is simple.  Be aware.  Be careful.  And be kind.  With these three simple guiding principles, you are extremely unlikely to have any issues.   

To Tour or Not to Tour

Ok, with that big one out of the way.  Let’s take on the second big one.  Do I need to go with a tour?  To this we offer a resounding NO!  Somehow, you found our blog.  This leads us to believe that you are the type of person that can do a basic internet search.  If you can do that, you can navigate Israel on your own.  That simple.  If you can read and speak basic English, you will have no challenges there.

Perspective

A word of disclosure.  This was Mike’s second visit to Israel. The first time he traveled with the American Jewish Committee as a part of a leadership exchange.  This offered a uniquely Judeo-view of both the history and the spiritual perspectives.  We are practicing members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon) and we traveled this time with another couple who are devout Roman Catholics.  We will try out best to offer insights on all three of these perspectives.  Regardless of your level of religiosity, you will find the history of the region compelling.

If you need some help packing, not forget the Fighting Couple Packing Guide.

Getting there/Tel Aviv

The major gateway in and out of the country is Ben Gurion Airport in Tel Aviv.  Tel Aviv is the secular capital of Israel; Jerusalem is of course the spiritual one.  Many of the world’s leading airlines have regular flights there.    The airport sits roughly 10 miles west of Tel Aviv.  There are many shuttles back and forth.  We highly recommend that you rent a car.  All of the major rental car companies have representation there.

Landed!

Once you arrive, depending on the timing, you may wish to overnight in Tel Aviv.  Early arrivals will give you the leg up on getting to Jerusalem.  The City of David is roughly an hour drive from Tel Aviv.  It is all freeway, and could not be easier.  If you are accustomed to driving on US or European freeways, you will be very comfortable.

We recommend doing a large circle route: starting in Tel Aviv and driving to Jerusalem.  Use Jerusalem as a base to see the sights of the town and then take a day trip to the Dead sea and to Bethlehem.  From there drive north to Nazareth and the Sea of Galilee.  We then recommend driving out to the coastal town of Acre and following the freeway south along the Mediterranean back to Tel Aviv. 

We took a total of 12 days in see Israel on the route listed above, and saw Wadi Rum and Petra, Jordan.

Jerusalem

The first thing you need to know about Jerusalem: there is the city, and then there is the old city, which is a city within a city.  Most of the historic religious sites lie within the walls of the old city.  Park your car for the time you are in Jerusalem.  All sites can be seen by walking and public transport.

The Old City

One of the seven gates into the old city

The old city is divided into four sections: the Jewish Quarter, Muslim, Armenia and the Christian quarter.  Armenia is represented, and has a long connection with the city, as they were the first country that officially named Christianity as the state religion.  The entire old city is surrounded by a massive wall built in the early 16th Century by the Turkish Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent.  There are seven gates into the city…ok we lied, there are really eight, but one is no longer in use…and there is an interesting story about that. (https://new.goisrael.com/article/252).

A great way to really get a feel for highpoints of the Christen sites is to follow the Via Dolorosa.  This follows the path of Christ’s last moments.  To those of the Catholic faith, each of these stops will ring very familiar.  https://www.dolr.org/stations-of-the-cross/jerusalem

The walk begins where Christ was condemned to die, walking to where he sees his mother and where Simon takes up the cross for the Savior, and ends at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre.   The path is mostly cobblestones and pavement.  You will definitely want good walking shoes.  There are plenty of places to stop along the path for water or refreshment.

Church of the Holy Sepulchure

The Church of the Holy Sepulchure

The last four stations of the Via Dolorosa are contained in the church.  It is massive.  Here you will see the slab of rock that Christ was placed after his crucifixion.  Many other sites were identified by St. Helena.  Constantine the Great converted to Christianity in 312AD.  Shortly thereafter, he dispatched his mother, Helena to the region to begin the process of identifying where the stories of the Bible took place.  By inspiration, advice, and some other more interesting methods, she was able to key in on were everything happened.  On her direction, the Church of the Holy Sepulchre was constructed on the site of an old pagan temple.  It has expanded and changed over the centuries since.  A mixture of crusades, Muslim protection, earthquakes, and internal architectural disputes have led this building to be one of the most interesting and disputed structures ever built.  One of more intriguing stories is the “immoveable ladder.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immovable_Ladder

Today it is the home of six Christian orders with each sect battling an internal turf war within the building for control and real estate.  Often these disputes turn to fisticuffs.  Make sure and read the Wikipedia profile of the Church.  Very helpful:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_the_Holy_Sepulchre   If you wish, a number of parishioners call be “locked” into the church overnight.

To those of the LDS faith and others, visiting this site can be a bit overwhelming.  While held in reverence by so many sects, the crowded, smoke filled church is constantly loud, contentious, gaudy and combined with forceful docents, we found it difficult to make a strong spiritual connection to Christ while inside the church. Luci got yelled at while trying to go inside the tomb by a demanding priest who wanted people to hurry and our friends got kicked out of mass even though they are Catholic. However, we should note that we were befriended by an Armenian priest, who blessed us with holy oil and that was the highlight of the visit to the church.

One of the biggest challenges for us as Latter-day Saints and others is the desire to stand, or be near the exact spot “where it happened.” Few places exist today were one can say with sureness that “this is the place,” where the Savior stood.  Yes, you are within hundreds of feet of where these events took place, but exactness is hard to come by. In addition, the real stones the Savior would have walked are typically 80 to 100 feet below you as the city has been conquered and rebuilt. In the end, we learned that it’s ok to be “ok” with this.  As the “Fighting Couple” always says… “make sure you are fighting for the right things.”

The Garden of Gethsemane

Across the valley from the old city is the Garden of Gethsemane.  The word Gethsemane translated means “oil press.” It is here that tradition holds that Christ prayed, as his disciples slept the night, before his crucifixion.   Today the Church of All Nations is on the site.  The ceiling is a stunning blue and décor is incredible.

We felt a strong connection to Christ in this area.  It was less crowded, and being among the 2000+ year old olive trees really lends to quiet refection on the Atonement. We also bought small bottles of olive oil here.

The Garden Tomb

One of the most peaceful places we have found in Jerusalem is the Garden Tomb.  Many Protestant groups claim this as the tomb of Christ.  It is located just outside the Damascus Gate.  Those of the LDS faith will immediately recognize this setting.  Pictures of the Garden tomb appear in many versions of the standard works.  It was unearthed in the mid 1850s.  It is surrounded by a peaceful garden and is an ideal setting to contemplate. 

The Garden Tomb

Many claim John’s comment, “Now in the place where he was crucified there was a garden; and in the garden a new sepulchre, wherein was never man yet laid.” KJV (John 19:41) to be evidence of the correct location.  Again, it is nearly impossible to pinpoint the exact location of the Tomb. 

While a number of LDS leaders have had a strong affinity for this being the Tomb of Christ, no definitive declaration has been made that we are aware of.  Mormon scholar Dr. John Tvedtnes shares some interesting research on the topic:  (https://www.lds.org/ensign/1983/04/the-garden-tomb?lang=eng&query=garden+tomb)

The Western Wall

Perhaps the most sacred spot for Jews is the remnant of the temple wall.  Jews come from all around the world to pray, and worship at the foot of what would have been the temple.  Especially at the close of Shabbat, or sabbath the place is filled with songs, prayers and rejoicing.   The Western Wall is separated into a men’s and women’s side.  Jew and Gentile must cover their heads as they approach the wall. You can also write prayers and stuff them into one of the cracks in the wall.

The Dome of the Rock

The most recognizable structure in all of Israel is the beautiful Dome of the Rock. It is one of the most sacred houses of worship for Muslims. Its beautiful blue octagon walls and golden dome rival any temple we have seen. The location is believed by Jews to be the place were Adam was created. It is also believed to be the location where the Old Testament prophet Abraham attempted to sacrifice his son Issac. This is also believed to be the place where the Prophet Muhammad ascended to heaven. While you cannot enter the mosque as a non-believer, you can enjoy the peacefulness and beauty of this site.

BYU Israel

BYU JerusalemLocated on the Mount of Olives is the Brigham Young University Jerusalem Center for Near Eastern Studies.  The center is a satellite campus of Brigham Young University, one of the largest religious universities in the world.   A few hundred students reside at the center for a semester.  The center is open for tours and often offers free concerts from their concert hall overlooking the old city.  It is a view not to be missed. The LDS Church leases the property, thus it is difficult to know how long the center will remain in its current location.

Dead Sea and Masada National Park

One of the side trips we highly recommend is a three hour drive south east to the Dead Sea.  Swimming in the Dead Sea is a once in a lifetime opportunity.  There is nothing like it.  You will float no matter how hard you try not too! The water feels slick like a truck load of essential oils were dumped in it. To get the most of the experience, cover yourself in mud, let it bake, and swim in the sea to dissolve it. Your skin will feel like you just left a five star spa. There are a number of public beaches that have changing facilities and you can buy mud at local stores.

Looking down on the Dead Sea is the might fortress of Masada.  Once a last refuge from the Romans, Masada is a collection of ruins atop a lofty plateau that can be accessed by a strenuous hike or a comfortable tram.  This is an important and moving place for Jews.  It symbolized the rebellion against Roman invaders and a last desperate act against domination. It is both a spiritual and patriotic place for Jews. For Americans it would be like combining Valley Forge and the National Cathedral. The views of the area are worth the price of admission.  A couple hours is really adequate in our eyes to see the area. Check out the museum which has the actual rocks or lots where the men of Masada wrote their names as too who would be killed next.

Bethlehem

The birthplace of Christ is a must see during your visit.  Bethlehem is located 5 miles south of Jerusalem.  The city is controlled by the Palestinian Authority.  It has a very different vibe than what you have been experiencing in Jerusalem.  The Church of the Nativity is being remodeled at the time of this writing.  In the grotto you can visit what is believed to the be manager where Christ was born. Take a public bus to get there from outside the Old City. We suggest bus #21. It’s safe and easy. It will drop you off a ten minute walk to the Church of the Nativity. Taxi cabs in Jerusalem will try to swindle you by charging $200 to $500 to take you to the Church.

The Jordan River

Jordan River

While there is not a definitive spot where tradition holds the Savior was baptized, the Jordan River holds a special place in the Christian tradition.  Just south of the Sea of Galilee, in a wide spot in river, is a commercial baptism center.  Here patrons can be baptized. It felt a bit like the baptism scene in “Oh Brother, Where Art Thou.” There is a changing station if you want to pay to get baptized and a sizable gift shop. You can put your feet in the water without paying, but swimming is discouraged.

Capernaum and the Mt. of Beatitudes

On the north shore of the Sea of Galilee are the ruins of the City of Capernaum.  During Christ’s ministry, he spent a great deal of time here.  It is here that he met Peter and a number of his other apostles including Andrew, James, and John.  He taught, lived, and worshiped here.  We learn of many healings that took place in the city:

Mark 2:1-5 And again he entered into Capernaum after some days; and it was noised that he was in the house.

2 And straightway many were gathered together, insomuch that there was no room to receive them, no, not so much as about the door: and he preached the word unto them.

3 And they come unto him, bringing one sick of the palsy, which was borne of four.

4 And when they could not come nigh unto him for the press, they uncovered the roof where he was: and when they had broken it up, they let down the bed wherein the sick of the palsy lay.

5 When Jesus saw their faith, he said unto the sick of the palsy, Son, thy sins be forgiven thee.

Today you can walk around the ruins of the city and there are a number of alcoves and areas you can stop for reflection.  In the center is the octagonal church.  It is here were Catholic tradition holds that an invalid was lowed through the roof and was healed by Christ.  One of the highlights for us is as you walk in through the front gates, there is a statue of Christ on a park bench.  It almost looks like it is a vagrant taking a nap.  It is only after you see the nail prints in his hands and feet to you realize who the person is.  It is very impressive.

Just above Capernaum is where tradition holds that the Savior would have given the Sermon on the Mount.  With its lofty view of the Sea of Galilee, it is perhaps one of the best views in the Holy Land.  A peaceful and reflective spot!

Church of Annunciation

 

Nazareth

Nazareth is the town that Jesus was raised.   Here you will find the Basilica of the Annunciation.  This is by far, one of our favorite churches in the Holy Land.  It was built to feel like it was made of wood.  There are many stunning stained glass windows throughout.  The theme of this church is the figure of Mary.   There are many colorful pieces of artwork, done by artists around the globe that surround the outer courtyard and the inner basilica. 

According to Catholic tradition, this is the spot where Mary’s childhood home would have stood.  The current church there was built in 1969, on the top of an earlier Crusader era church.  It has been classified as a minor basilica.  Mass is celebrated there in multiple languages. 

On the way back

You have hit the major religious sites if you have followed our plan above.  Now how about some sun, sand and surf?  Head east till you need a boat.  The Mediterranean Sea is a beautiful and warm reward for tired bodies.  We spent some time in the Medieval city of Acre.  Very interesting history and architecture.  We highly recommend spending a day or two unwinding before you head back to busy Tel Aviv.

To see more pictures for this amazing place please visit our Facebook and instagram pages:

https://www.instagram.com/fightingcouple/

https://www.facebook.com/1000fights
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Our 7 Questions with Fins to Spurs

What if you could try another career? Even for a short time, would you try a different job just to see what it could be like? We would like to introduce you to a traveling couple that not only tries a new job every few months, but does it in another part of the world! Please meet Christine and Adam of www.finstospurs.com.  We put our seven questions to these two wandering workers:

Blog:  www.Finstospurs.com

twitter:  @finstospurs

Instagram:  @finstospurs

 

First off, tell us a little about yourselves?  How long have you been a traveling couple?  How did you meet?

We have been together for about two years now, most of which has been on the road!  We are from completely different backgrounds, Adam from a rural community in Nebraska, Christine from just outside Seattle, Washington.  We both moved to Kona, Hawaii to work on scuba diving boats and met while working at the same dive shop!  Our passion for adventure and travel drove us together and we quickly teamed up to start our latest tour of the world in August 2014!

Christien West, Adam Maire, Fins to Spurs, Nicaragua

Christine West, Adam Maire of Fins to Spurs in Nicaragua

1)   You two are on such an amazing adventure!  Tell us about one of your best and worst experiences?

He Said: When Christine and I were working as ranch managers in Nicaragua, one of the local ranch hands was incredibly talented, wanted to help in every way, but was very young.  At 16, Ariel was trying to learn as much as possible, but we needed someone who could not only work at the ranch but travel to other parts of the community.  Ariel needed to learn how to drive.  One of my favorite experiences was teaching Ariel how to drive a manual–in my terrible Spanish!  He was hilarious and joking the whole the time (I think?!) and we had a blast together!  The worst experience?  A 12-hour bus ride in the same area with “travelers stomach” in the dark on a bumpy road with a bathroom that had no light and a broken door.

She Said: Just recently Adam and I went to Ubud, Bali and visited a monkey sanctuary.  We are incredibly lucky travelers sometimes, and we just happened to arrive at the sanctuary as a MASSIVE celebration of harmony with nature and animals was beginning!  Hundreds of locals in formal dress were giving offerings, music was playing, the monkeys were excited and seemed to be so interested—it was amazing.  We listened, watched, were so overtaken by the beauty…all because our yoga class was changed and we had extra time that day.  Which brings me to the worst experience of Bali: Adam and I are extremely new to yoga and were trying some different styles of yoga in Ubud…it just seemed like the fun thing to do!  The class that we really wanted to try was cancelled, so we signed up for Partner Acro Yoga.  When we arrived, things were fine for about two minutes and then the next moment I saw people around us getting ready for what looked like a collective wheel-barrel race – one that we were losing!  It was all too much FAST—our hung-over teacher was late, the space was small, every move seemed upside down and WAY beyond our skills in life…We slipped out of class on minute 9 and ended up going to the monkey sanctuary!  Worst experience is never that bad J

 

2) If you had to travel with someone else besides your travel partner, who would it be?  (this person can be living, historical or mythical?.)

He Said: Pretty much anyone who is hilarious!  Maybe Will Ferrell or Ryan Reynolds.  I just want to be able to laugh my though any mildly bad situation.  Will Ferrell is always so obscure that anything could be fun and I can really appreciate Ryan Reynolds sarcasm. If you know any other comedian that is usually pretty positive I am open to suggestions!

She Said: Oh I agree with Adam 100%. Being able to laugh is mandatory for me.  But my vote is more for Ryan!!

Adam from Fins to Spurs

Adam from Fins to Spurs

3)One of our fave posts is about your volcano hike.  Tell us, what it as exhausting as it looked?

He said: Oh my God YES!! I spent 6 years in the Infantry where we hiked EVERYWHERE with overloaded rucks.  I thought I was pretty tough but that hike nearly killed me.  Our guide was 7 feet tall and nearly ran up the mountain!  It is all straight up, very few switchbacks in the beginning and the first third is through loose, soft gravel.  We earned every foot of elevation we gained!

She said: First, the weather was everything! We were told it was going to pour rain all day so we thought we should bring double clothes. It never did rain, by the way.  We carried over 40 lbs. straight up that loose dirt and ash volcano!  I kept adjusting the straps on my backpack but I have so little experience, it was ALL so heavy!  It was insanely awesome, I would do it again, but way less in the pack.

traveling couple Guatemala

Acatenango, Guatemala

4)  If you had to eat one last meal, what/ where would you eat?

He said: I try to eat every meal like it is my last, I usually finish half of Christine’s food too!  I love Indian and Thai food so much but my favorite is Mexican.  When we lived in Guatemala, Christine made these killer smothered burritos that were the size of a small dog, all in our little apartment.  I would have to make that my last meal but I would eat it on any beach with a GREAT sunrise and a Black Butte Porter!

She said: You know, I spent two years teaching in Istanbul, and Turkish food was introduced to me by my students.  I liked it in the beginning, but then over two years I grew to LOVE IT!!! I would have an Istanbul street food feast with pide, doner, yogurt, lahmacun, sutlac and all with raki! Yum!!!

1000Fights:  YUM!

5)  What advice would you have for a couple that is considering following your path and working around the world?

He said: GO and DO IT!! We aren’t trying to sell quit the 9 to 5 or permanently abandon your current job, just take a little more time off, find a job or volunteer opportunity, and travel!!  This life isn’t easy.  We don’t have the stress of normal work but a job is a job.  Whatever the job is you still have co-workers you don’t love and long hours.  We just want everyone to know that you can stay longer in these locations and learn SO much more about them than just a few days here and then moving on to a new location.

She said: I think my advice would be to start slowly.  I started working abroad when I was 19 years old as a bartender in England.  Your first job abroad is rough, then you finish that one and you think, that was SIMPLE AND FANTASTIC, so you do it again.  You take more risks, you challenge yourself with more languages, locations and different types of jobs…it gets more and more adventurous.  As a couple, you will do this together!  Your experiences get more memorable, more life changing, more inspired.  Is you ease into this process with your partner, maybe starting with vacations combined with work/volunteer opportunities, your relationship has a chance to be EVEN CLOSER, with this completely different experience as something only the two of you really know about.

traveling couple

Fins to Spurs at Karon Beach, Thailand

6) If you could solve one problem in the world what would it be?

He said: Our lack of care for nature.  If humans don’t stop using up our resources we are going to wake up one day with no Earth to call home.  The shark finning and destruction of coral reefs is forever changing our oceans for the worse.  We recently hunted one of the species of rhinos into extinction just for its horn and another species only has four left… in the entire world!  Global warming is destroying our poles year after year and spreading FAST!  The human race is going to have to unite to conserve what little bit of nature we have left!

She said: If I could “solve” one thing, it would be living in extremes.  I wish people could live with more balance.  For example, the internet is great, it has the ability to forward education for people who would never otherwise have access. However, people can’t spend ALL DAY online.  Go outside!!  See other people in real life!! Eat, smell, and see other places!  Or food: I absolutely love amazing food, but you can’t eat everything and anything all the time.  The goal in my mind to live a balanced life, integrating more patience into every activity in your day.

 

7)You knew it was coming….What has been your greatest travel fight/disagreement?

She said: Travel is tough sometimes.  Adam is my favorite travel partner in the world.  No question.  However, our rare disagreements do happen.  I remember when we finished 9 months in Central America, our flight flew through Seattle, my hometown that I hadn’t been to in years.  And we only had two hours in Seattle before we flew to Alaska, but in this airport there is an Ivar’s, the BEST restaurant for clam chowder in the world.  I WANTED THIS CHOWDER!  I was dreaming about it for more than a few weeks.  So, when we arrived in Seattle, we bee-lined to Ivar’s.  But when we got there,  Adam wanted all this other stuff like fish and was spending WAY too much money and we had this tense moment over the food (it was stupid)…and because of the fight…I didn’t want my precious chowder anymore.  It was a fight over the bowl of soup…medium or large.  It was an argument over  $2.  It’s hard to understand, but after 9 months of spending, it seemed like too much.  I guess that’s travel for you, you sort of lose it all (your mind) and gain it all at the same time!

He said: In my defense, I wanted the large bowl of soup so she got enough, and I could finish what she didn’t want.  It was really more about 24 hours straight of flights, car rides, and fast food that really put the stress on the situation.  I still feel bad I ruined the soup for her.  We really do get along pretty well, but we both HATE being cold.  On the few occasions we have worked in the cold it has become the blame game and a small spat.  You know, the typical: “working in the snow was YOUR idea!” and “That’s it!! You NEVER get a say in the job choice again!!!”  A warm coffee and a heater and it all just goes back to normal!

Now those two know how to fight! We are very impressed. A huge thanks to our friends Christine and Adam for graciously answering our 7 questions.  Give their blog a follow!

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Seven Questions: What is an AngloItalian?

In this installment of our Seven Questions series we want to introduce you to a new traveling couple species: An Angloitalian.  Dale & Franca combine to make a traveling couple that are always up for an adventure!

Blog:  AngloItalian

twitter:  @AI_FollowUs

Facebook: angloitalian

Google +: Angloitalian

1) What in the world is an Angloitalian?

Angloitalian is a word that originates from one of our first dates. On the second time we met up we decided that we’d walk around the town we were living to take some night time shots of our surroundings and each other. Inject some tomfoolery, some timed multi-shot laughs and a Facebook photo album the day after named ”The Anglo-Italian Connection Photo Session” and you’ve the origins of a cute name we thought identified not just that night, but our origins from different countries and the idea that great things can happen when you travel to see things and meet people.

traveling couple

The Traveling AngloItalian

2) If you had to travel with someone else besides your travel partner, who would it be?  (this person can be living, historical or mythical?)

He Said: One running joke we have between us is my sarcastic ‘interest’ in the great Italian historical of Garibaldi.

During our few trips to Italy it’s always been fun to note just how many streets and statues in Italy are dedicated to this man who’s (after uniting Italy) actually had quite a shady past.  I’d love to have been around Garibaldi to see the man as he really was, not as he’s remembered.

She Said: I needed to think a little bit about this question, but I’ve finally come out with an answer.

I’d love to spend some time with Anish Kapoor to get to know him better and what a better occasion if not a trip. I absolutely love his work and I’d love to see other sides of his personality. It could turn into a disaster and that he turned out to not be the man I imagined him to be but I could say that at least I tried it and seen the day-to-day life as an international artist.

3)What has been your favorite destination in your wanderings?

He said: During the beginning of October of this year we spent a week with some fantastic friends in Slovenia who across a number of days took us on road trips all over the country showing us just how much there is to see and do in a country full of fantastic countryside, magnificent ski slopes and cities full of magnificent culinary delights.

She said: It’s such a difficult question to answer, every place I’ve visited has something special to be remembered for. If I have to choose I’d probably say Japan because is such a unique country in many ways. Its culture and lifestyle are very different to any of the ones I know of. The food is probably the best in my opinion too, I’d love to go back there one day.

 1000Fights: Do you LOVE couple travel?  Want to be featured in our 7 questions?  Just get in touch with us (here).

4)  One of our fave parts of your blog is your quest to capture interesting designs from around the globe.  Could you share with us your fave?

He said: We love to highlight all kinds of design from coffee shops to local trinkets and some items of clothing but by far I think the one we love the most are the Pandism tshirts from Bangkok, Thailand.

She said: I loved a small and cozy coffee shop in Bangkok that we went to called ‘Gallery Drip Coffee’. The interior design is simple, very nice and goes perfectly with their mission which is all about serving the best coffee by looking after every detail from the preparation to the serving.

Traveling couple

5)  How do you guys stay on budget so well? We are very impressed!

He said: I think it’s purely built out of the fear of running out of cash and finding ourselves stranded somewhere!

She said: We simply choose what to do carefully and skip all the activities that are ‘not necessary’ for us, in this way we can spend more on what we love like visiting art exhibitions or similar events and places.   We also try to live more like locals instead of eating and staying in touristic places, couchsurfing helped a lot for sure!

 6) If you could solve one problem in the world what would it be?

He said: This is a tough one to answer as unfortunately there are many problems in the world that need solving.

She said: I agree with Dale, it’s hard to choose only one. I’d definitely love to save the animals in danger to make sure they can survive and live in their natural habit without human disturbance.

 

traveling couple

The angloItalians…always looking for the next adventure.

 7)You knew it was coming….What has been your greatest travel fight/disagreement?

He said: We won’t lie and say that we never fight, but we fall out all the time, generally over silly things so those moments don’t last all that long; but there was one moment near the beginning of our travels where we both got pretty darn angry with each other.

She said: It was during the first week or two of our travels and we were in Rome. What happened was that we were wondering around the city and whilst we just like to wonder without knowing where we’re headed, there are moments when knowing where we’re headed on a map is pretty handy, trouble is, Dale’s sense of direction and knowing where he is pretty amazing and before he’s looked at a map he knows where he is and where we’re headed, so when he wasn’t showing me the map to point where we were headed I got pretty cross.

It was such a silly thing but I like to know where I’m headed, it takes me a little while to figure it all on the map but I liked to know at that point. To cut a long story short, I got angry because I didn’t know where we were headed, Dale got angry because he was annoyed that I might doubt him.

Fast forward a year and I’m so glad that Dale is so good with the map that I tend to never look as it’s completely unnecessary. We can wonder anywhere and I know he’ll know the way to get back somewhere else and it’s actually enhanced our ability to wonder around the ‘off the beaten path’ places because I know he’ll get us back with ease.

Again, it’s only a silly thing, but at the time it felt like all out war. All couples will fight and those who say they don’t are lying. Spending every hour of every day month after month can be stressful, it’s how you learn to work with it that makes the relationship stronger in our eyes.

1000Fights: Wow!  AngloItalian thanks for sharing your story with us!  You can tell that they have a ton of spunk!  Give their blog (AngloItaliana follow!

 

 

 

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